Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)

RP Models SKU: RP-01-B-0008
Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)
Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)
Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)
Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)
Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)
Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)

Viking in Stamford Bridge (Bust)

RP Models SKU: RP-01-B-0008

Incl. VAT:  Regular price
Excl. VAT:  Regular price
/
  • Low stock - 2 items left
  • Inventory on the way
All model kits require assembly and painting
Shipping calculated at checkout.
Add To Wishlist

1/12 scale resin bust.

Please note that this is a 3D-Printed Model.

Limited Edition of 150 units

The  Battle of Stamford Bridge  (Old English:  Gefeoht æt Stanfordbrycge ) took place at the village of Stamford Bridge, East Riding of Yorkshire, in England, on 25 September 1066, between an English army under King Harold Godwinson and an invading Norwegian force led by King Harald Hardrada and the English king's brother Tostig Godwinson. After a bloody battle, both Hardrada and Tostig, along with most of the Norwegians, were killed. Although Harold Godwinson repelled the Norwegian invaders, his army was defeated by the Normans at Hastings less than three weeks later. The battle has traditionally symbolized the end of the Viking Age, although major Scandinavian campaigns in Britain and Ireland occurred in the following decades.

The death of King Edward the Confessor of England in January 1066, had triggered a succession struggle in which a variety of contenders, from across north-western Europe fought for the English throne. These claimants included the King of Norway, Harald Hardrada. According to the  Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Manuscript, the Norwegians assembled a fleet of 300 ships to invade England. The Norwegian army most likely numbered between 7,000 and 9,000 men. Arriving off the English coast in September Hardrada was joined by further forces recruited in Flanders and Scotland by Tostig Godwinson. Tostig was at odds with his elder brother Harold (who had been elected king by the Witenagemot on the death of Edward). Having been ousted from his position as Earl of Northumbria and exiled in 1065, Tostig had mounted a series of abortive attacks on England in the spring of 1066. King Harold was in Southern England, anticipating an invasion from France by William, Duke of Normandy, another contender for the English throne. Learning of the Norwegian invasion he headed north at great speed with his huscarls and as many thegns as he could gather, traveling day and night. He made the journey from London to Yorkshire, about 185 miles (298 km), in only four days, enabling him to take the Norwegians completely by surprise. Having learned that the Northumbrians had been ordered to send the additional hostages and supplies to the Norwegians at Stamford Bridge, Harold hurried on through York to attack them at this rendezvous on 25 September. Until the English army came into view the invaders remained unaware of the presence of a hostile army anywhere in the vicinity. The sudden appearance of the English army caught the Norwegians by surprise. The English advance was then delayed by the need to pass through the chokepoint presented by the bridge itself. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the Chronicle of Henry of Huntingdon have it that one of the Norwegians (armed with a Dane Axe) blocked the narrow crossing and single-handedly held up the entire English army. The story is that this Viking alone cut down up to 40 Englishmen and was defeated only when an English soldier floated under the bridge and thrust his spear through the planks in the bridge, mortally wounding the warrior. His name was not preserved in the aftermath of this battle. This delay had allowed the bulk of the Norse army to form a shieldwall to face the English attack. Harold's army poured across the bridge, forming a line just short of the Norse army, locked shields and charged. The battle went far beyond the bridge itself, and although it raged for hours, the Norse army's decision to leave their armor behind left them at a distinct disadvantage. Eventually, the Norse army began to fragment and fracture, allowing the English troops to force their way in and break up the Scandinavians' shield wall. Completely outflanked, and with Hardrada killed with an arrow to his windpipe and Tostig slain, the Norwegian army disintegrated and was virtually annihilated. In the later stages of the battle, the Norwegians were reinforced by troops who had been guarding the ships at Riccall, led by Eystein Orre, Hardrada's prospective son-in-law. Some of his men were said to have collapsed and died of exhaustion upon reaching the battlefield. The remainder were fully armed for battle. Their counterattack, described in the Norwegian tradition as “Orre's Storm”, briefly checked the English advance, but was soon overwhelmed and Orre was slain. The Norwegian army was routed. As given in the Chronicles, pursued by the English army, some of the fleeing Norsemen drowned whilst crossing rivers. So many died in an area so small that the field was said to have been still whitened with bleached bones 50 years after the battle.

King Harold accepted a trick with the surviving Norwegians, including Harald's son Olaf and Paul Thorfinnsson, Earl of Orkney. They were allowed to leave after giving pledges not to attack England again. The losses the Norwegians had suffered were so severe that only 24 ships from the fleet of over 300 were needed to carry the survivors away. They withdrew to Orkney, where they spent the winter, and in the spring, Olaf returned to Norway. The kingdom was then divided and shared between him and his brother Magnus, whom Harald had left behind to govern in his absence. The casualties are referred as so high on both sides in many sources. An English-born Norman historian Orderik Vital reports half a century later, that the whaling ground is still “(…) is easily recognizable by the piles of bones that still bear witness to the heavy losses on both sides ”.

Harold's victory was short-lived. Three days after the battle, on 28 September, a second invasion army led by William, Duke of Normandy, landed in Pevensey Bay, Sussex, on the south coast of England. Harold had to immediately turn his troops around and force-march them southwards to intercept the Norman army. Less than three weeks after Stamford Bridge, on 14 October 1066, the English army was decisively defeated and King Harold II fell in action at the Battle of Hastings, beginning the Norman conquest of England, a process facilitated by the heavy losses amongst the English military commanders.

 

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recently viewed